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Causes of Pityrosporum folliculitis

Pityrosporum folliculitis cannot be called as an infection; it is just an overgrowth of normal folliculitis. The yeast overgrowth may be encouraged by external factors and by reduced resistance on the part of the host.

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Malassezia (formerly known as Pityrosporum) is a genus of related fungi, classified as yeasts, naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals including humans. It can cause hypopigmentation on the chest or back if it becomes an opportunistic infection. Some confusion exists about the naming and classification of Malassezia yeast species due to a series of changes in their nomenclature. Work on these yeasts has been complicated because they are extremely difficult to propagate in laboratory culture. Malassezia were originally identified by the French scientist Louis-Charles Malassez in the late 19th century. Raymond Sabouraud identified a dandruff-causing organism in 1904 and called it "Pityrosporum malassez", honoring Malassez but at the species level, not the genus. When it was determined that the organisms were the same, the term "Malassezia" was judged to possess priority. In the mid 20th century, it was reclassified into two species: In the mid 1990s, scientists

Malassezia (formerly known as Pityrosporum) is a genus of related fungi, classified as yeasts, naturally found on the skin surfaces of many animals including humans. It can cause hypopigmentation on the chest or back if it becomes an opportunistic infection.

 

Nomenclature

Some confusion exists about the naming and classification of Malassezia yeast species due to a series of changes in their nomenclature. Work on these yeasts has been complicated because they are extremely difficult to propagate in laboratory culture.

Malassezia were originally identified by the French scientist Louis-Charles Malassez in the late 19th century. Raymond Sabouraud identified a dandruff-causing organism in 1904 and called it "Pityrosporum malassez", honoring Malassez but at the species level, not the genus. When it was determined that the organisms were the same, the term "Malassezia" was judged to possess priority.

In the mid 20th century, it was reclassified into two species:

  • Pityrosporum (Malassezia) ovale which is lipid dependent and found only on humans. P. ovale was later divided into two species, P. ovale and P. orbiculare, but current sources consider these terms to refer to a single species of fungus, with M. furfur the preferred name.

  • Pityrosporum (Malassezia) pachydermatis, which is lipophilic but not lipid dependent and found on the skin of most animals.

In the mid 1990s, scientists at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France discovered additional species.

Currently there are 10 recognized species:

  • M. furfur

  • M. pachydermatis

  • M. globosa

  • M. restricta

  • M. slooffiae

  • M. sympodialis

  • M. nana

  • M. yamatoensis

  • M. dermatis